U.S. Wants 9/11 Health Program to Include 50 Cancers

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health unveiled a proposal Friday for a major expansion of an existing 9/11 health program

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    Federal officials say a health program for first responders and New Yorkers affected by the toxic dust unleashed in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center should be expanded to include 50 types of cancer.

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health unveiled a proposal Friday for a major expansion of an existing 9/11 health program.

    The expansion would make workers and lower Manhattan residents suffering from the effects of the toxic dust eligible for free treatment and potentially hefty compensation payments.

    The decision follows a March recommendation by an advisory committee that cancer be added to the $4.3 billion program.

    Previously, it has only covered people with a short list of less-serious ailments, including respiratory problems like asthma.

    The expansion proposal will be open for public comment before it takes effect.

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