Meghan McCain's Mysterious Mission | NBC New York

Meghan McCain's Mysterious Mission

Baffling cable news appearances don't offer easy answers

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    We didn't care about what this person had to say when her father was campaigning for president. So why should we listen now?

    The former presidential candidate and current senator from Arizona, John McCain, has a daughter named Meghan. You may have heard of her, because she is currently impossible to escape. Turn on the news, open a Web browser, and there she is, saying or typing some fairly obvious remark for no apparent reason.

    Ms. McCain wrote about her father's campaign on the McCain Blogette, a harmless and inoffensive Web site that said zero interesting things during the entire campaign season. Her job was not to stir up controversy, after all; it was to "humanize" her rough-hewn dad and weirdly robotic mom by writing about goofy moments on the trail.

    Most of the blogosphere (ugh, that word) went pretty easy on her, because she was a private citizen who steered clear of policy debates and mostly just wanted to post photos of her father's bus. So, fine. People left her alone.

    Meghan McCain on Rachel MAddow

    But since her father's defeat, Meghan McCain has taken a turn for the weird. She's writing on "The Daily Beast" about how her father's campaign ruined her love life. She's picking fights with Ann Coulter, for heaven's sake, a laughable charlatan who might have been worth battling four or five years ago, when she was still relevant. And most confusingly, Meghan McCain is going on cable news shows to comment on topics such as the economy and then saying, "I don't know a whole lot about economics, so I can't comment on that."

    So what is her aim here? Why is she suddenly ubiquitous? Maybe she wants a TV gig. Maybe she's just a little bored and wants something to do besides hanging out in Sedona with her mom all the time. Or maybe she got so used to being asked questions during her father's campaign that she mistakenly reached the conclusion that she has something to say.

    Sara K. Smith writes for NBC and Wonkette.