Sarah Palin Comes Out Swinging | NBC New York

Sarah Palin Comes Out Swinging

Self-described hockey mom launches blistering assault against Obama, media, Washington elite

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    Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin addresses the Republican National Convention.

    Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, in her first real introduction to the American people as Sen. John McCain’s running mate, struck back last night at news organizations and a “Washington elite” that have raised questions about her qualifications to be vice president.

    As Palin accepted the vice presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minn., her experience — she has been mayor of tiny Wasilla, Alaska, and has served as Alaska’s governor for less than two years — was front and center in voters’ minds. Palin’s personal life has also become a topic of discussion after she revealed that her 17-year-old unmarried daughter was pregnant.

    Sarah Palin Addresses RNC

    [NEWSC] Sarah Palin Addresses RNC
    Welcomed by cheering delegates, the 44-year-old Alaska Governor, former mayor and self-described hockey mom Sarah Palin brought down the G.O.P house at the Republican Convention Wednesday night.Palin showed humor. "You know the difference between a hockey mom and a pitt bull?" she joked. "Lipstick!" Palin took on Barack Obama and skeptics of her experience. "I guess a small town mayor is sort of like a community organizer except that you have actual responsibilities," Palin said. (Published Thursday, Sept. 11, 2008)

    Palin acknowledged that she had not been in politics for long, calling herself “just your average hockey mom [who] signed up for the PTA because I wanted to make my kids’ public education better.”

    But in a speech that connected strongly with delegates who interrupted her numerous times with standing ovations, she dismissed critics of her background as snobs who looked down on ordinary Americans and their concerns.

    “I’m not a member of the permanent political establishment,” Palin said. “And I’ve learned quickly these past few days that if you’re not a member in good standing of the Washington elite, then some in the media consider a candidate unqualified for that reason alone.

    “But here’s a little news flash for all those reporters and commentators: I’m not going to Washington to seek their good opinion,” she said. “I’m going to Washington to serve the people of this country.”

    Continuing a relatively recent tradition, McCain surprised the crowd by joining Palin on stage after her address.

    “Don’t you think we made the right choice for the next vice president of the United States?” asked McCain, who was formally nominated for president after the speeches and was to give his formal acceptance speech Thursday night.

    The campaign said Palin co-wrote her address with Matthew Scully, who has written for McCain and previously for President Bush. The Obama campaign picked up on that fact in its brief response, which it released during the roll call of the states that was making McCain’s nomination official.

    “The speech that Governor Palin gave was well delivered, but it was written by George Bush's speechwriter and sounds exactly like the same divisive, partisan attacks we’ve heard from George Bush for the last eight years,” the campaign said in a statement.

    “If Governor Palin and John McCain want to define ‘change’ as voting with George Bush 90 percent of the time, that’s their choice, but we don’t think the American people are ready to take a 10 percent chance on change.”

    Palin, 44, contrasted her experience as a self-described “small-town mayor” with that of the Democratic presidential nominee, Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois.

    “Since our opponents in this presidential election seem to look down on that experience, let me explain to them what the job involves,” Palin said. “I guess a small-town mayor is sort of like a ‘community organizer,’ except that you have actual responsibilities.”

    Palin did not mention Obama by name, but her target was obvious: Obama began his political life as a community organizer.

    “I might add that in small towns, we don’t quite know what to make of a candidate who lavishes praise on working people when they are listening and then talks about how bitterly they cling to their religion and guns when those people aren’t listening,” she said, alluding to an early gaffe by Obama during the primary campaign, when he suggested that working-class Americans tended to “cling to religion and guns” in tough times.

    Swiping at Obama’s campaign theme, Palin added:

    “Here’s how I look at the choice Americans face in this election. In politics, there are some candidates who use change to promote their careers. And then there are those, like John McCain, who use their careers to promote change. ...

    There is only one man in this election who has ever really fought for you, in places where winning means survival and defeat means death, and that man is John McCain.”

    The McCain campaign has lashed out at the media and called for an end to questions about Palin’s background and her family. Besides blanket coverage of her daughter’s pregnancy, Palin also is the subject of an ethics investigation involving the firing of the state’s public safety commissioner, allegedly because he would not dismiss Palin’s former brother-in-law, a state trooper. 

    Palin addressed those reports only in passing Wednesday night.

    “From the inside, no family ever seems typical,” she said. “That’s how it is with us. Our family has the same ups and downs as any other, the same challenges and the same joys.”

    But at the same time that the campaign was pressuring reporters to stop asking about her children, Palin invoked her family several times in explaining why she was proud to run on the same ticket with McCain.

    Palin praised the senator as “a man who wore the uniform of this country for 22 years and refused to break faith with those troops in Iraq who have now brought victory within sight.”