Send God a Holy Tweet | NBC New York

Send God a Holy Tweet

Western Wall is accepting prayers on its Twitter page



    AFP/Getty Images
    Next time, Obama can just tweet his prayer from his BlackBerry.

    Leaving a prayer at the Western Wall has never been easier.

    The Western Wall, or Kotel as its officially known, is offering petitioners the chance  to send them their prayers via their Twitter page where they will be printed out and left at the Wall.

    In a statement released on their website,, the Kotel's main reason for accepting prayer tweets was to give everyone a chance to leave their prayers at the Wall.

    "It seemed perfectly sensible, almost trivial, to provide anyone on the planet the opportunity to quickly and easily place his prayer in the Kotel. Tweeting only takes a few seconds and its substantially easier, quicker and cheaper than hoping on a plane to Israel," read the release.

    The Kotel, located in Jerusalem's Old City, is all that remains from the second Jewish temple that was destroyed by the Romans in 70 A.D. It is believed that the Wall is located where King Solomon built his first temple, which was destroyed by the Babylonians over 600 years earlier.

    Now, the wall is considered a direct channel to God and is constantly flooded by visitors who leave their hand-written prayers between their 2,000 year-old stones. To make space for new letters, the wall's rabbi collects the notes twice a year during Passover and Jewish New Year, and buries them in accordance to Jewish custom, which forbids the destruction of writings that mention God. 

    The Tweet Your Prayers account that was started by a "young man from Tel Aviv," isn't charging for the service, but they are accepting donations.