Counter Intelligence: Digg, Spray-On Solar & Risque Ads | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: Digg, Spray-On Solar & Risque Ads

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    A number of Christian entrepreneurs angry at GoDaddy's risque Super Bowl commercial have pulled their web sites from the company's servers. The sexually suggestive spot, which featured Danica Patrick, led Christians to demand their hosting and email services be moved to another provider.

    Check out our daily list of must-read articles that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over instant message or wherever people actually talk these days.

    • The BlackBerry for babies is finally here. With the new "Text and Learn" PDA-type handheld device from LeapFrog even tots can get hooked on technology. The gadget is for kids as young as three-years-old and has a full qwerty keyboard.
    • A new cheap and efficient way to make solar panels is to simply spray them on. Researchers are working on a project to create spray-on solar panels that could transform the production of solar cells.
    • MrBabyMan is a one-man aggregator. He has submitted roughly 12,000 links to Digg, the biggest popularity contest on the web, and more than one-quarter of them have made it to the front page. Most layman who submit items to the site get only a handful of votes. "It's like an instinct," he said.
    • Two million people showed up Denny's restaurants across the country yesterday to take advantage of the free breakfast promotion that aired during the Super Bowl. The restaurant chain got a lot of bang for their buck -- drawing in many new patrons for the estimated total cost of $5 million.
    • Accelerated thinking can make you happy, a new study shows. The reason rapid-fire thinking creates feelings of elation, creativity and power is unclear and the feeling is ephemeral -- though doctors argue the positive emotion ads up.
    • A number of Christian entrepreneurs angry at GoDaddy's risque Super Bowl commercial have pulled their web sites from the company's servers. The sexually suggestive spot, which featured Danica Patrick, led Christians to demand their hosting and email services be moved to another provider.