Counter Intelligence: MLB Gives DNA Tests to Prospects | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: MLB Gives DNA Tests to Prospects

DNA samples are taken from prospective players or their parents

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    NEWSLETTERS

    MLB is conducting genetic tests on prospective players and their parents.

    See why the MLB is testing DNA of prospective players and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

    • MLB is conducting genetic tests on prospective players and their parents. The organization is using the tests to weed out those who have misrepresented their identity and ages -- and relies on samples taken from the prospective player or his parents to do so when other probing methods prove ineffectual. Some even undergo bone scans.
       
    • "The Wire" creator David Simon urged newspapers to unite and go against federal anti-trust laws so they could collude -- and then blame it on him when the feds show up. Simon issued a rallying cry to the publishers of the The New York Timesand The Washington Postto grow some and implement a subscribers-only policy on the web.
       
    • Italy is host to the first masters program in the world dedicated to international art crime studies. The class focuses on a mosaic of lectures on international organized crime, art history, criminology and museum security and forgery. The country itself has 20,000 art  thefts annually and has the most theft of its kind in the world.   
       
    • Americans may be abandoning luxury goods wholesale -- but they aren't willing to put aside their funnel cakes. County fairs across the country have reported booming business as families, not willing to go on pricey out-of-town trips, are relegated to hanging out at the fair. 
       
    • A dust cloud that weighed nearly one million tons remained nearly intact as it circled the world in just 13 days, scientists said. The cloud was kicked up by a storm in one of China's desert that is roughly the size of France. A n air flow carried it over the clouds and into a fast-flowing air current under the stratosphere, which it began to circle the Earth.