Counter Intelligence: Quidditch for the College Crowd | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: Quidditch for the College Crowd

Kids have taken up an even more egregious pastime than Frisbee: Quidditch

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    College students across the country are ditching Frisbees, stowing away hacky sacks and picking up broomsticks to engage in an even more egregious passtime: Quidditch.

    See why college kids are trading Frisbees for broomsticks and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

    • College students across the country are ditching Frisbees and hacky sacks in favor of broomsticks to engage in an even more egregious pastime: Quidditch. The "Harry Potter"-based game in which students run around a field with brooms between their legs and try to throw a ball through multiple freestanding hoops. The Intercollegiate Quidditch Association says the game has gained traction and more than 200 colleges have expressed interest or are starting their own teams.
       
    • Google Earth has gone to the moon. The newest software, released on the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, allows users to explore the moon in 3-D through its satellite imaging software. Users can see what it's like on the lunar surface with the help of panoramic photos stitched together and previously unreleased NASA footage shot on the moon.
       
    • The number of senior citizens in the U.S. will spike to 1.3 billion by 2040 and make up 14 percent of the world's total population. It will be the first time in history that people aged 65 and older will outnumber those under the age of 5. There were 506 million people aged 65 or older in the U.S. as of mid-2008.  The increase in the aging population could send health care costs and public spending skyrocketing, slowing economic growth, according to a new study.
       
    • Unemployed people looking for information online about government benefits in Brazil had to type in passwords like "bum" and "shameless" to access the site. A spokesman for the government-backed site said the private company created the security system and has since been given a pink slip.