Counter Intelligence: Least Inhabited Place on Earth

By Xana O'Neill
|  Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009  |  Updated 1:38 PM EDT
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Space Shuttle Atlantis Hubble Mission

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A new study shows that the sediment on the seafloor in the middle of the South Pacific appears to have the fewest living cells of any place on the planet.

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Check out the least inhabited place on the planet and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

  • Scientists believe they've found the least inhabited place on Earth. A new study shows that the sediment on the seafloor in the middle of the South Pacific appears to have the fewest living cells than anywhere else on the planet. Researchers collected sediment samples from the ocean floor -- about 2.5 to 3.7 miles under the surface -- and found 1,000 living cells in each cubic centimeter. That's about 1,000 times less than the number found in other sediments. 
     
  • A museum wants the remnants of your breakup. The Museum of Broken Relationships urges the broken-hearted to donate material objects from their breakups to the museum anonymously as part of its world-wide touring exhibition. Founders Olinka Vistica and Drazen Grubisi said the museum is "a chance to overcome the emotional collapse through creation." Submissions have included pictures, letters, leg prosthesis and a gall stone.
     
  • The Swedish amabassador met with the two U.S. journalists jailed in North Korea in what was his first visit to the imprisoned reporters since they were slapped with a 12-year sentence. The ambassador represents the U.S. in the country because the U.S. does not have diplomatic relations with the North Korea.
     
  • The Department of Homeland Security plans to scrap a Bush-era program that allowed local law enforcement to use spy satellites. The Bush administration began using the secret surveillance after the 9/11 attacks. The change in policy indicates that the department is reframing its intelligence goals on making sure states and other officials get terrorism information they need.
     
  • A new study suggests that humans are more inclined to perform tasks when the request is received in their right ears. The research shows that natural side-bias manifests itself in human behavior and that most people prefer being addressed in their right ears. 

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