"I'm a Prisoner in My Own House!" Howls Madoff | NBC New York

"I'm a Prisoner in My Own House!" Howls Madoff

Feds find massive trove of papers in Queens warehouse



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    Federal investigators have been looking at a warehouse full of documents pertaining to the case of Bernard Madoff.

    Bernie Madoff is a bird in a gilded cage and he is not happy about it.

    "I'm a prisoner in my own house!" Madoff groused, according to a New York Post source. "I can't go anywhere! I'm stuck here all day!"

    As part of his $10 million bail agreement, Madoff must remain under house arrest in his $7 million Park Avenue penthouse.

    Madoff stands accused of bilking investors of $50 billion in what is being called the biggest Ponzi scheme in the history of man.

    He then aggravated matters two weeks ago by mailing more than $1 million in jewels to friends and family, inspiring a judge to tighten his bail restrictions.

    And in case Madoff tries to go anywhere in cyberspace, the feds will know. His phone and Internet connection are reportedly being monitored.

    Warehouse Discovered in Queens

    The massive paper trail in Madoff's fraud case has led investigators to a New York City warehouse containing boxes and file cabinets stuffed with documents that could reveal more clues about what may be the largest Ponzi scheme ever.

    The official says the Queens building was used to store old records from Madoff's investment firm, located across the East River in Manhattan. The official isn't authorized to discuss the case publicly and spoke Wednesday on condition of anonymity.

    Federal regulators embedded themselves weeks ago at Madoff's midtown headquarters to study records from his trading business and his secretive side venture as an investment adviser.

    Court papers say Madoff claims he lost more than $50 billion belonging to investors.

    Mini-Madoff Making Recent Headlines

    Long Island investor Nicholas Cosmo was charged Tuesday in a $370 million Ponzi scheme of his own.

    He's alleged to have hired convicted criminals as brokers, blown millions of dollars in bad commodities trades and spent his victims' money on jewelry and limousines, officials said.

    Cosmo turned himself in Monday night and is being held until his next hearing on Thursday.

    Associated Press news researcher Judith Ausuebel contributed to this report.