Counter Intelligence: Booze, Anti-matter and Fast-Food | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: Booze, Anti-matter and Fast-Food

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    the biggest beer festival worldwide. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)

    Read this and you'll look smart. You don't have to be intelligent to impress people -- you just have to fake it. Here's a daily list of fascinating articles that will wow your friends, surprise your co-workers and make you seem sharp at a cocktail party or over the lunch counter....

    • The search for anti-matter could be more complicated than scientists first anticipated. Researchers collected data that shows no evidence of anti-matter -- but the non-finding suggests a limit to where the particles could be lurking.
    • Two abstract works by American artist Mark Rothko that are displayed at the Tate Modern in London may be hanging incorrectly. Critics charge that the two paintings from the Black on Maroon series are hanging vertically instead of horizontally.
    • Hotels are trying to woo guests by enticing them with the latest technological gadgets and outfitting their lounges with Nintendo Wii consoles, digital book readers and web cameras.
    • AT&T took a chance when they launched the BlackBerry Bold on Election Day -- and the contrarian thinking has a number of marketing gurus calling the the company's move into the vacuum created by all the election news a smart bet.
    • Drink to your health!  A new beer called BioBeer has three genes spliced into a special yeast that produces the chemical in red wine that helps prevent diabetes, cancer and age-related conditions.
    • Fast-food restaurants are built on corn. Chemical analysis from the nation's on-the-go eateries shows that nearly every cow or chicken used in fast-food is raised on a diet of corn.
    • Roughly 30 percent of the world's undiscovered oil and gas are below the ice of the Arctic Ocean. The rules for seabed resource claims and mapping will likely have to be revisited as each nation tries to stake a claim in the resources.