Counter Intelligence: It Takes 8.2 Seconds to Fall in Love | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: It Takes 8.2 Seconds to Fall in Love

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    Scientists claim it takes a man 8.2 seconds to fall in love at first sight.

    See why some doctors are learning the craft from TV in our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

    • Scientists claim it takes a man 8.2 seconds to fall in love at first sight. The research also indicated that if a man's gaze lasts just four seconds he may not be interested -- but if that gaze lasts just 4.2 seconds longer he could be in love. Women stare equally long at a man regardless of whether they find him attractive. We beg to differ.
       
    • If you hate facebook's new redesign, you'll eventually get over it. The latest backlash over the facebook layout is simply a predictable response that is typical of those for whom web habits have become ingrained. But who will really care about these changes in 6 months? Probably no one. Mark Zuckerberg in a memo quoted by Gawker on Friday told workers to ignore users' suggestions because "the most disruptive companies don't listen to their customers." 
       
    • Schoolgirls in one U.K. school district will soon be able to request the morning-after pill by texting their school nurse. The nurse will then schedule a time to meet up with the student and give her the pill. There is no limit to the number of times girls can use the service, and parents will not be automatically notified if their child has requested the pill.
       
    • Sure, he's hot -- but would you really trust George Clooney to perform a life-saving procedure? On second thought... Doctors-in-training notoriously perform life-saving procedures incorrectly because they are modeling their technique after faux physicians on TV dramas, a new study found. A survey of doctors-to-be in Canada showed that most incorrectly insert life-saving intubation tubes -- and that the majority confessed they picked it up from primetime.
       
    • How does the nation's more clandestine international organization recruit its spies? The same way you sell a Snuggie: TV, radio and social networking sites. The CIA is reportedly trying lure America's brightest with promises of "adventure" "patriotism" and "ambiguity." That last one is a particularly interesting selling point. Naturally, the agency's presence on facebook spawned a group called "CIA Out of Facebook." It's unclear whether the organization is reaching out to social networks because it failed to meet recruiting goals.